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Attitudes and Perceptions on LGBT Rights Among Voters for the Coalition and Opposition Parties

Year: 2023


Authors: Dr. Sigal Goldin.


The purpose of the study was to compare attitudes and perceptions on LGBT rights among voters for the parties participating in the coalition in the 25th Knesset (noting the differences between voters for the Likud party and voters for the other parties in the bloc supporting Netanyahu), and among those who voted for parties that are not partners in the coalition. At the same time, the main trends relating to the attitudes and perceptions of the entire Jewish public in Israel regarding LGBT rights were briefly surveyed.

Methodology: The survey included 541 respondents (Jews, age 18 and over), who constitute a representative sample of the Jewish public in Israel. The data collection was conducted by the Midgam Institute. The questionnaire included the following topics: (1) attitudes and perceptions on LGBT rights in Israel, (2) preferences regarding the new government's actions on LGBT rights, (3) perceptions regarding LGBT families, (4) social and family ties with members of the LGBT community. The survey was conducted in the last week of December 2022. The survey was distributed digitally and conducted using acceptable sampling methods. Sampling error: +/-4.2%.


Key insights:


'Common and Wanted' on LGBT Equal Rights

There was broad agreement among the Israeli public (77%) that LGBT people should receive full equal rights, like all citizens. At the same time, a majority of the public (57%) thought that LGBT people did not currently receive full rights. In other words, from the perspective of the general public in Israel, there was a substantial gap (almost 3 times) between what was found and what was desirable: 77% believed that there should be full equality of rights, but only 28% believed that a situation of equal rights did exist.

The gap between what was found and what was desirable was maintained among all voter groups (Likud, the other coalition parties, parties that were not in the coalition), but the gaps between those who believed that LGBT people should receive full equal rights and those who believed that today there were equal rights in practice varied between groups of voters. While among voters for opposition parties the gap stood at 4.4 times, among Likud voters the gap was 2.0 times, and among voters for the other coalition parties 1.35 times.

Preferences on government action on LGBT rights

Among the general public, an overwhelming majority of 82% preferred that the government act to expand or preserve LGBT rights, with 51% preferring expanding rights, and 31% believing that rights should be preserved as they are. Among voters for the various parties, 85% of Likud voters preferred that the next government not harm LGBT rights, 58% of voters for the other parties in the coalition, and 94% of voters for parties that were not in the coalition.


Perception of LGBT Families in Israel (Jews)

A large majority of the Israeli public (69%) saw a family with two fathers or two mothers as a "worthy family" just like any other family. In terms of voting for parties, a majority of Likud voters (66%) supported this position, as did an overwhelming majority of voters for parties that were not in the coalition (94%). In contrast, most voters for coalition parties other than the Likud (62%) did not believe that a family with two fathers or two mothers was a "worthy family" just like any other family.


Social and family ties with LGBT people among party voters

While on most questions it was evident that Likud voters were closer in their positions and perceptions to voters for parties that were not in the coalition than those of the other parties that were members of the coalition, an examination of social and family ties with members of the gay community painted a slightly different picture. A higher percentage of voters for coalition parties without the Likud had LGBT friends and relatives compared to the percentage of LGBT friends and relatives of Likud voters. On average, voters for parties that were not in the coalition had more LGBT friends and relatives than voters for the coalition parties.



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